Chris Jones

Journalist, researcher, editor and occasional translator based in London.

Common European Asylum System: deadlock in the Council as "frontline" Member States oppose mandatory "border procedures"

"Council discussions on controversial proposals for dealing with asylum applications at the external borders of the EU hit a wall recently, with "a large majority" of Member States who favour tougher measures facing opposition from those on the "frontline". Member States' diplomatic representatives were called upon to try to reach a resolution, but the Council is remaining tight-lipped on the outcome of those discussions."

Common European Asylum System: deadlock in the Council as "frontline" Member States oppose mandatory "border procedures" (Statewatch, 30 April 2019)

Another update on the EU's ongoing attempts to revamp its "common" asylum system. It seems that states such as Italy and Greece - who are placed at a structural disadvantage by the EU 'Dublin' rules that require people to apply for international protection in the first EU state they set foot on - are opposed to attempts by other Member States to make asylum border procedures mandatory, including for people rescued at sea.

Asylum claims can be assessed at the border in a number of ways under the current rules; the basic upshot is that the rejection rate for such claims (about 90%) is far higher than for claims submitted within a state (about 65%). In this regard, it looks like the attempt to enforce mandatory border procedures is more about reducing the number of succesful asylum applications than anything else.

<< Go back to the previous page